BAAS Conference Tartu 2016 Program finalized!

Thursday, 7.04.2016

9.00 – 10.00 Registration & Welcome Coffee (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

10.00 – 10.30 Welcome Addresses (Jakobi 2 Lecture Theatre)

10.30 – 11.20 Keynote Speech I (Jakobi 2 Lecture Theatre)

Audrius Beinorius (Vilnius University, Lithuania) “(Post) Colonial Imagination and Textological Commitments in Buddhist Philosophy Studies”

11.30 – 13.00 Poster Session I & Coffee Break (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

13.00 – 14.00 Lunch Break

14.00 – 15.40 Panels & Sections I

Panel 2: Turkic-speaking Peoples of Central Asia from a Linguistic Perspective, part I (University Main Building, room 232)

Panel 4: Ancient Near Eastern Lamentation Literature: Sceneries of Destruction (University Main Building, room 139)

Panel 6: Chinese Language Studies in Connection with the West, part I (Lossi 3-307)

Section 2: Japanese and Korean Studies: Culture and Literature, part I (University Main Building, room 128)

Section 6: Cross Cultural Studies: East and West, part I (Ülikooli 16-212)

15.40 – 16.00 Coffee Break (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

16.00 – 18.00 Panels & Sections II

Panel 2: Turkic-speaking Peoples of Central Asia from a Linguistic Perspective, part II (University Main Building, room 232)

Panel 6: Chinese Language Studies in Connection with the West, part II (Lossi 3-307)

Section 2: Japanese and Korean Studies: Culture and Literature, part II (University Main Building, room 128)

Section 5: Ancient Near Eastern Studies (University Main Building, room 139)

Section 6:  Cross Cultural Studies: East and West, part II (Ülikooli 16-212)

19.00 Welcome Reception (University Café, Ülikooli 20)

Friday, 8.04.2016

9.30 – 10.00 Late Registration & Morning Coffee (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

10.00 – 10.50 Keynote Speech II (Jakobi 2 Lecture theatre)

Gebhard J. Selz (University of Vienna, Austria) “The Invention of Writing and the Mesopotamian World View”

11.00 – 11.50 Keynote Speech III (Jakobi 2 Lecture Theatre)

Robert Rollinger (University of Innsbruck, Austria) “Peripheries and Centres: Empires of the Ancient Near East in the 1st Millennium BCE”

11.50 – 13.00 Poster session II & Coffee Break (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

13.00 – 14.00 Lunch Break

14.00 – 15.40 Panels & Sections III

Panel 1: Contemporary Conflicts in the Middle East, Their Historical, Cultural and Ethnic Legacy and Possibility for Intercultural Dialogue (Jakobi 2-106)

Panel 3: Turkic-speaking Peoples of Central Asia from a Historical Perspective, part I (Jakobi 2-102)

Panel 5: Soft Security Challenges in East Asia, part I (Jakobi 2-130)

Panel 8: Politics of Identity and Memory in Post-colonial and Post-socialist Fragmentation of Belonging, part I (Jakobi 2-110)

Panel 9: Buddhist Concepts and Practices: Understanding and Interpreting Them in the Contemporary World, part I (Ülikooli 16-212)

Panel 10: Mythological Concepts in Mongolian Literature, Folklore and Language, part I (Jakobi 2-107)

15.40 – 16.00 Coffee Break (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

16.00 – 18.00 Panels & Sections IV

Panel 3: Turkic-speaking Peoples of Central Asia from a Historical Perspective, part II (Jakobi 2-102)

Panel 5: Soft Security Challenges in East Asia, part II (Jakobi 2-130)

Panel 8: Politics of Identity and Memory in Post-colonial and Post-socialist Fragmentation of Belonging, part II (Jakobi 2-110)

Panel 9: Buddhist Concepts and Practices: Understanding and Interpreting Them in the Contemporary World, part II (Ülikooli 16-212)

Panel 10: Mythological Concepts in Mongolian Literature, Folklore and Language, part II (Jakobi 2-107)

19.00 Cultural Event: FA Schola Ensemble – The Bridge Over Time: Italian Instrumental Music from 13th-15th Century Sources and Modal Improvisations (University Main Building, Assembly Hall)

20.00 Conference Club (University Café, Ülikooli 20)

Saturday, 9.04.2016

10.00 – 11.40 Panels & Sections V

Panel 11: Genealogies in the Ancient World, part I (Jakobi 2-102)

Section 1: Chinese Studies: Ancient and Modern, part I (Ülikooli 16-212)

Section 3: Arabic Studies: Politics, Language and Literature, part I (Jakobi 2-114)

Section 7: Linguistic and Cultural Concepts in South Asia (Jakobi 2-130)

11.40 – 12.00 Coffee Break (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

12.00 – 14.00 Panels & Sections VI

Panel 7: What Do We Learn from Crises? Historical Aspects and Alternative Solutions (Jakobi 2-130)

Panel 11: Genealogies in the Ancient World, part II (Jakobi 2-102)

Section 1: Chinese Studies: Ancient and Modern, part II (Ülikooli 16-212)

Section 3: Arabic Studies: Politics, Language and Literature, part II (Jakobi 2-114)

Section 4: Persian, Turkish and Azeri Studies: Texts and Translations (Jakobi 2-106)

14.00 – 14.30 Closing Addresses (Ülikooli 16-212)

15.00 – 17.00 BAAS Board Meeting (Jakobi 2-115)

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Baltic Alliance for Asian Studies (BAAS) Conference Tartu 2016, April 7–9: Preliminary Program announced!

Thursday, 7.04.2016

9.00 – 10.00 Registration & Welcome Coffee (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

10.00 – 10.30 Welcome Addresses (Jakobi 2 Lecture Theatre)

10.30 – 11.20 Keynote Speech I (Jakobi 2 Lecture Theatre)

Audrius Beinorius (Vilnius University, Lithuania) “(Post) Colonial Imagination and Textological Commitments in Buddhist Philosophy Studies”

11.30 – 13.00 Poster Session I & Coffee Break (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

13.00 – 14.00 Lunch Break

14.00 – 15.40 Panels & Sections I

Panel 2: Turkic-speaking Peoples of Central Asia from a Linguistic Perspective, part I (University Main Building, room 232)

Panel 4: Ancient Near Eastern Lamentation Literature: Sceneries of Destruction (University Main Building, room 139)

Panel 6: Chinese Language Studies in Connection with the West, part I (Lossi 3-307)

Section 2: Japanese and Korean Studies: Culture and Literature, part I (University Main Building, room 128)

Section 6: Cross Cultural Studies: East and West, part I (Ülikooli 16-212)

15.40 – 16.00 Coffee Break (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

16.00 – 18.00 Panels & Sections II

Panel 2: Turkic-speaking Peoples of Central Asia from a Linguistic Perspective, part II (University Main Building, room 232)

Panel 6: Chinese Language Studies in Connection with the West, part II (Lossi 3-307)

Section 2: Japanese and Korean Studies: Culture and Literature, part II (University Main Building, room 128)

Section 5: Ancient Near Eastern Studies (University Main Building, room 139)

Section 6:  Cross Cultural Studies: East and West, part II (Ülikooli 16-212)

19.00 Welcome Reception

Friday, 8.04.2016

9.30 – 10.00 Late Registration & Morning Coffee (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

10.00 – 10.50 Keynote Speech II (Jakobi 2 Lecture theatre)

Gebhard J. Selz (University of Vienna, Austria) “The Invention of Writing and the Mesopotamian World View”

11.00 – 11.50 Keynote Speech III (Jakobi 2 Lecture Theatre)

Robert Rollinger (University of Innsbruck, Austria) “Peripheries and Centres: Empires of the Ancient Near East in the 1st Millennium BCE”

11.50 – 13.00 Poster session II & Coffee Break (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

13.00 – 14.00 Lunch Break

14.00 – 15.40 Panels & Sections III

Panel 1: Contemporary Conflicts in the Middle East, Their Historical, Cultural and Ethnic Legacy and Possibility for Intercultural Dialogue (Jakobi 2-106)

Panel 3: Turkic-speaking Peoples of Central Asia from a Historical Perspective, part I (Jakobi 2-102)

Panel 5: Soft Security Challenges in East Asia, part I (Jakobi 2-130)

Panel 8: Politics of Identity and Memory in Post-colonial and Post-socialist Fragmentation of Belonging, part I (Jakobi 2-110)

Panel 9: Buddhist Concepts and Practices: Their Understanding and Interpreting in the Contemporary World, part I (Ülikooli 16-212)

Panel 10: Mythological Concepts in Mongolian Literature, Folklore and Language, part I (Jakobi 2-107)

15.40 – 16.00 Coffee Break (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

16.00 – 18.00 Panels & Sections IV

Panel 3: Turkic-speaking Peoples of Central Asia from a Historical Perspective, part II (Jakobi 2-102)

Panel 5: Soft Security Challenges in East Asia, part II (Jakobi 2-130)

Panel 8: Politics of Identity and Memory in Post-colonial and Post-socialist Fragmentation of Belonging, part II (Jakobi 2-110)

Panel 9: Buddhist Concepts and Practices: Their Understanding and Interpreting in the Contemporary World, part II (Ülikooli 16-212)

Panel 10: Mythological Concepts in Mongolian Literature, Folklore and Language, part II (Jakobi 2-107)

19.00 Cultural Event: FA Schola Ensemble – The Bridge Over Time: Italian Instrumental Music from 13th-15th Century Sources and Modal Improvisations (University Main Building, Assembly Hall)

20.00 Conference Club (University Café, Ülikooli 20)

Saturday, 9.04.2016

10.00 – 11.40 Panels & Sections V

Panel 11: Genealogies in the Ancient World, part I (Jakobi 2-102)

Section 1: Chinese Studies: Ancient and Modern, part I (Ülikooli 16-212)

Section 3: Arabic Studies: Politics, Language and Literature, part I (Jakobi 2-114)

Section 7: Linguistic and Cultural Concepts in South Asia (Jakobi 2-130)

11.40 – 12.00 Coffee Break (Jakobi 2 Lobby)

12.00 – 14.00 Panels & Sections VI

Panel 7: What Do We Learn from Crises? Historical Aspects and Alternative Solutions (Jakobi 2-130)

Panel 11: Genealogies in the Ancient World, part II (Jakobi 2-102)

Section 1: Chinese Studies: Ancient and Modern, part II (Ülikooli 16-212)

Section 3: Arabic Studies: Politics, Language and Literature, part II (Jakobi 2-114)

Section 4: Persian, Turkish and Azeri Studies: Texts and Translations (Jakobi 2-106)

14.00 – 14.30 Closing Addresses (Ülikooli 16-212)

15.00 – 17.00 BAAS Board Meeting (Jakobi 2-115)

Baltic Alliance for Asian Studies (BAAS) Conference Tartu 2016, April 7–9: Keynote Speeches, Panels, Sections, and Poster Presentations announced!

Keynote Speeches:

Audrius Beinorius (Vilnius University, Lithuania) “(Post) Colonial Imagination and Textological Commitments in Buddhist Studies”

Gebhard J. Selz (University of Vienna, Austria) “The Invention of Writing and the Mesopotamian World View”

Robert Rollinger (University of Innsbruck, Austria) “Peripheries and Centres: Empires of the Ancient Near East in the 1st Millennium BCE”

Panels:

  1. Contemporary Conflicts in the Middle East, Their Historical, Cultural and Ethnic Legacy and Possibility for Intercultural Dialogue
  2. Turkic-speaking Peoples of Central Asia from a Linguistic Perspective
  3. Turkic-speaking Peoples of Central Asia from a Historical Perspective
  4. Ancient Near Eastern Lamentation Literature: Sceneries of Destruction
  5. Soft Security Challenges in East Asia
  6. Chinese Language Studies in Connection with the West
  7. What Do We Learn from Crises? Historical Aspects and Alternative Solutions
  8. Politics of Identity and Memory in Post-colonial and Post-socialist Fragmentation of Belonging
  9. Buddhist Concepts and Practices: Their Understanding and Interpreting in the Contemporary World
  10. Mythological Concepts in Mongolian Literature, Folklore and Language
  11. Genealogies in the Ancient World

Sections:

  1. Chinese Studies: Ancient and Modern
  2. Japanese and Korean Studies: Culture and Literature
  3. Arabic Studies: Politics, Language and Literature
  4. Persian, Turkish and Azeri Studies: Texts and Translations
  5. Ancient Near Eastern Studies
  6. Cross Cultural Studies: East and West
  7. Linguistic and Cultural Concepts in South Asia

Poster Presentations:

Session 1

Session 2

International Symposium “Concepts of Human and Humanity in Religions”

University of Tartu
Faculty of Theology
Centre for Oriental Studies, Faculty of Philosophy

International Symposium
Concepts of Human and Humanity in Religions
5–6 December, 2014
Tartu, Jakobi 2 (UT Philosophicum), Room 114

PROGRAM

Friday, 5 December

9:30 – 10:00    Registration and morning coffee
10:00 – 10:15    Opening the symposium, welcome address by Prof. Riho Altnurme, Dean of the Faculty of Theology

First session: Concepts of human and humanity in Ancient World and Pre-Columbian America
10:15 – 10:45    Peeter Espak – The chronology of Sumerian myths about the creation of man
10:45 – 11:15    Vladimir Sazonov – Theology of war and divine warfare of the Neo-Assyrian kings Sennacherib and Esarhaddon
11:15 – 11:45    Tarmo Kulmar – Zum Priesterstand, zum Amt des Oberpriesters und zur Priesterfunktion des Kaisers im Inkareich
11:45 – 12:15    Coffee break
12:15 – 12:45    Mait Kõiv – Man, polis, and the gods in the early Greek thought
12:45 – 13:15    Jaan Lahe – Ein Aspekt des Menschenbildes der Antike: Das Schicksal des Menschen nach dem Tod im römischen Mithraskult im Kontext der Philosophie und Religion der römischen Kaiserzeit
13:15 – 15:15    Lunch break

Second session: Concepts of human and humanity in pre-modern India and China
15:15 – 15:45    Agita Baltgalve – Sanskrit mantras as an intermedium between the human and the divine
15:45 – 16:15    Anna Neivirt – Gods and heroes in a South Indian epic (Kāṭamarāju Katha)
16:15 – 16:45    Märt Läänemets – The evolution of the concept of man in the context of creation myth in Indian traditions
16:45 – 17:15    Coffee break
17:15 – 17:45    Margus Ott – Man in early Chinese philosophical thought
17:45 – 18:15    Erki Lind – Being human – a bodily and an ethical concept in Ge Hong’s early medieval Daoism
19:00    Reception in the University Caffé (Ülikooli kohvik), Ülikooli 20

Saturday, 6 December

9:30 – 10:15    Morning coffee

Third session: Concepts of human and humanity in contemporary religious and spiritual practices
10:15 – 10:45    Alar Kilp – The human rights doctrine of the Georgian Orthodox Church, Armenian Apostolic Church and Russian Orthodox Church as means of ecumenical dialogue and international diplomacy in South Caucasian conflicts
10:45 – 11:15    Henn Käärik – Calvin and the Newcomb’s paradox
11:15 – 11:45    Rasa Pranskevičiūtė – Human and nature: Anastasian environmental communalism and nature-based spirituality in the Post-Soviet region
11:45 – 12:15    Coffee break

Fourth session: Concepts of human and humanity in New Testament
12:15 – 12:45    Randar Tasmuth – Humanness of humans and the transformation (from Saulus to Paulus)
12:45 – 13:15    Ain Riistan – Notes about the humanness of Jesus
13:15 – 13:30    Coffee break
13:30 – 14:30    Round table discussion and making conclusions

Presenteers (in alphabetic order)
Agita Baltgalve, Department of Asian Studies, University of Latvia, lecturer
Peeter Espak, Faculty of Theology, University of Tartu, senior researcher
Alar Kilp, Institute of Government and Politics, University of Tartu, chair of comparative politics, lecturer
Tarmo Kulmar, Faculty of Theology, University of Tartu, professor of comparative religion
Mait Kõiv, Institute of History and Archeology, University of Tartu, assistant professor
Henn Käärik, Institute of Social Studies, University of Tartu, assistant professor
Jaan Lahe, The Estonian Institute of Humanities, Tallinn University, assistant professor
Erki Lind, Faculty of Theology, University of Tartu, Ph.D. candidate
Märt Läänemets, Centre for Oriental Studies, University of Tartu, senior researcher
Anna Neivirt, Chair of Eastern Philosophy and Cultures, Faculty of Philosophy, Saint Petersburg State University, lecturer
Margus Ott, The Estonian Institute of Humanities, Tallinn University, lecturer
Rasa Pranskevičiūtė, Department of Sociology, Vitautas Magnus University (Kaunas), researcher
Ain Riistan, Faculty of Theology, University of Tartu, lecturer, researcher
Vladimir Sazonov, Centre for Oriental Studies, University of Tartu / Estonian Defense College, senior researcher
Randar Tasmuth, Institute of Theology of the EELC, Biblical Studies, New Testament, professor

Press release (in Estonian)